Scott Peska

Scott Peska

JSARP Editorial Board; Enough is Enough Co-chair of the CSVP KC; Region IV-East Representative, PPD

Assistant Vice President of Student Services
Waubonsee Community College

Dr. Scott Peska serves as the Assistant Vice President of Student Services at Waubonsee Community College in Sugar Grove, IL, with responsibility for Athletics, Testing Services, Access Center for Disability Resources, Registration & Records, and Financial Aid. He previously served Waubonsee as Dean for Students from 2012 to 2018. Prior to Waubonsee, Dr. Peska worked at Northern Illinois University in multiple roles within Student Affairs. After a tragic shooting on NIUs campus in 2008, Scott was asked to lead and establish the Office of Support & Advocacy, a unique unit designed to provide holistic support to those individuals directly impacted by the tragic shooting. As this Office of Support & Advocacy fulfilled its purpose, Peska also established and served as the Director of the Military Student Services department, providing financial benefits, counseling, and social support programming to the more than 800 military students at NIU.

Before NIU, Dr. Peska worked at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as a Resident Director for a living-learning community. He received both his baccalaureate and master’s degrees in communication from Illinois State University where he served as a graduate assistant residence hall coordinator. Peska received a doctoral degree in higher education administration at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with his research focusing on the adjustment of community college transfer students to four-year universities.

In NASPA, Dr. Peska is an active member serving as the Region IV-E Public Policy Division Representative and as the Enough is Enough Coordinator for the Campus Safety & Violence Prevention Knowledge Community. He also serves as a reviewer for the Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice. Dr. Peska enjoys speaking publicly on overcoming adversity, moving forward after campus tragedies, benefits of laughter in diversity education, juggling multiple priorities, and engaging in ethical leadership.